You might be related.  Start your tree to find out. It's free!

We’ll search our network daily and notify you when we find family tree matches.

Start your tree
Added by rodgertr

CATONERAS "Heather Flower" "Pocahontas of New York" Wyandance Montauk

1603-1659
Born: Eatons Neck, Suffolk, New York, USA
Died: Long Island City, Queens, New York, USA

Footprints
 
Family Members
  • Getting family members ...
 
 
Life Story
  • Birth

  • Marriage: From A Study Of Papers Copies Of Which Will Hereafter Appear We Learn That Jansen Married An Indian Girl Named

  • Death

  • Story: Parentage

    <p>http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/DEWITT/2012-03/1330920764</p> <p><span style="font-family: monospace; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">Asharoken the Matinecock probable father</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: monospace; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">{*Let me address here the misconceptions about Sarah Van Tassel's grandparents, CORNELIS JANSZEN VAN TEXEL and CATERONAS. Cornelis was born about 1600 in Texel, Netherlands, and married in about 1624 to CATERONAS (called Catherine by the Dutch). "We know from petitions to governors of the New York colony that Catoneras was a full-blooded Native American, the daughter of a sachem, and laid claim to land at the base of Eaton's Neck. We can infer from the petitions that the land was sold out from under the aboriginal inhabitants by men who did not have permission to do so. The plot described corresponds to a plot of land described in the records of Huntington, NY, as being sold by a sachem of the Matinecock band of Indians. We also know from that Wyandance--"grand sachem" of the Montauk tribe (whose homeland was the eastern part of Long Island, far from Huntington and Eaton's Neck)--was much, much too young to have fathered Catoneras. There is not a shred of evidence of h!</span><br style="font-family: monospace; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"><span style="font-family: monospace; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;">er in his more well-documented life." So, yes, Cateronas was the daughter of a sachem--probably the daughter of Asharoken the Matinecock--but just not the daughter of Wyandance the Montauk.</span></p>

  • Story: Doubtful Heritage

    <div style="color: #222222; font-family: arial; font-size: small;"> <div style="margin: 0px; padding: 5px 0px 0px; word-wrap: break-word; word-break: break-word; color: #333333; font-family: arial, 'helvetica neue', helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 16px;"> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px;">http://www.geni.com/people/Wyandanch-Grand-Sachem-of-Montaukett/5424717289970058750</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px;">The theory that he was the father of Cateronas, the Indian wife of Cornelis van Tassel, was advanced in an early genealogy of the family. It is now known that he cannot, on chronological grounds, have been her father, but the idea persists.'</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px;"><strong>Wyandanch (Wyandice, Wyandance)</strong>, born about 1620, probably near Eaton's Neck, Long Island, died 1659, was a Montauk Indian sachem, His name translates as "wise speaker". He was the most distinguished of the Montauk sachems who had authority over a confederacy of thirteen distinct tribes on what is now Long Island, New York.</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px;">Before the arrival of the Europeans the Montauks (or Montauketts, the seventeenth-century spelling revived by tribal members in the 1990s) located their villages along the banks of freshwater streams and tidal bays in the coastal areas on the southern fork of eastern Long Island in what is now the state of New York.</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px;">Wynandanch was friendly to the white settlers. Following the English destruction of the Pequot villages in Connecticut in 1637, he negotiated an alliance with the victors and encouraged the English to establish settlements on eastern Long Island. The English support enabled Wyandanch to become one of the most influential sachems on Long Island. By 1700, however, the English had taken possession of the Montauks' lands, leaving the Indians with only residence rights to a small area near the present-day village of Montauk.</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px;">--------------------</p> </div> </div> <div style="color: #222222; font-family: arial; font-size: small;"> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px; color: #333333; font-family: arial, 'helvetica neue', helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">Wyandance was chief and Grand Sachem of the thirteen tribes of Long Island. He figured as a great leader of his people against their enemies, while remaining a friend to white settlers. He sold land to both the Dutch and the English during the establishment of New Amsterdam and later New York. The thirteen tribes of Long Island were as follows: the Montauks, Manhassets, Shinnecocks, Corchaugs, Unkechaugs, Setauketts, Secktaugs, Nissaquogues, ,Merricokes, Marsapeagues, Matinecocks, Rockaways, and Canarsies. All were of the great Algonquin stock. &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;Each tribe had a Sachem or chief. Those of the four eastern tribes were brothers. The Over-lordship of these brothers and all the other tribes was given to Wyandance the Sachem of the Montauks, the most fierce of all the other tribes of Long Island. Wyandance the most noted of the Grand Sachems by the white race, did not hold that position at the first coming of the whites. He succeeded to it on the death of his brother Poggatacut, sachem of the Manhansetts in 1652. &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;Wyandance and the Montauks lived east of the South Hampton and East Hampton boundary line, the Shinnecocks, lived on the land westward from the Montauks to West Hampton. &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;Wyandance died in 1659. His alliance with the whites gave his people independence from his enemies on the main land, during his life time. but in the long run destroyed them through disease and being disinherited by the whites from their lands. By the year 1900, their language and culture had nearly been completely destroyed. &gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;&gt;Cantoneras, the daughter of Wyandance,and his wife married Cornelius Jensen VAN TEXEL abt.1624. Cantoneras claimed the ownership of that portion of Long Island, situated along the North Shore, or sound, abt. Eatons" Neck in Suffolk County. She died shorly after her father in 1659 or 1660.</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px; color: #333333; font-family: arial, 'helvetica neue', helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">VAN TASSEL FAMILY Cornelius Jensen VAN TEXEL b. abt. 1600, Isle of Texel, North Holland; prob. arrived New Netherlands abt. 1624; lived Long Island; married Cantoneras (dau. of Wyandance); child: 1. Jan Cornelius VAN TEXEL b. 1625 d. 1704; md. Annetje (dau. of Albert and Grietje (STEVENKONIN)) ALBERTS. He was selected to represent the Long Island Indians before Commissioners appointed to settle the wars between the Pequots, Narragansetts and other tribes.</p> <p style="margin: 10px 0px 15px; padding: 0px; line-height: 17px; color: #333333; font-family: arial, 'helvetica neue', helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">Catoneras, the dau. of Wyandance (the Sachem or Chief) of the tribe - claimed the ownership of that portion of Long Island, situated along the North Shore, or sound, abt. Eatons' Neck in Suffolk Co.; her father d. in 1659 and she shortly thereafter.</p> </div>

  • Story: Discussion

    <div style="border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #333333; font-family: georgia, 'bitstream charter', serif; font-size: 16px; line-height: 24px"><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">&nbsp;http://montaukett.net/?p=42</p><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">There are many references to Catoneras being the daughter of Wyandanch. Some historical records refer to Wyandanch as only having one daughter, Quashawam, who became Grand Sachem of the Montauk after Wyandanch&rsquo;s death. The Easthampton Library has a document dated in 1663 Quashawam Treaty. This treaty, negotiated between the Montauk and Shinnecock, and overseen by the Easthamptoners is signed by Quashawam, Grand Sachem of the Montauk. Therefore, the big question: Was Wyandanch&rsquo;s daughter, Quashawam, the Grand Sachem living in Montauk or Catoneras, married to Cornelius Jensen Van Texel, living on Eaton&rsquo;s Neck?</p><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">Van Tassel/Van Texel geneaology sites all identify Catoneras as the daughter of Wyandanch. For example:<br>Catoneras, the daughter of Wyandance and his wife married Cornelius Jensen VAN TEXEL abt.1624. Catoneras claimed the ownership of that portion of Long Island, situated along the North Shore, or sound, abt. Eatons Neck in Suffolk County. She died shortly after her father in 1659 or 1660.</p><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">Adding to the controversy is the ownership of Eatons Neck itself. The book, Faded Laurels, The History of Eaton&rsquo;s Neck and Asharoken by Edward A. E. Carr, describes the history of Eaton&rsquo;s Neck from 1639 through 1720. *download it here* It describes the purchase of Eaton&rsquo;s Neck from Raseokan, Sagamore of the Matinnecock. It never mentions Catoneras, or Dutch ownership of Eaton&rsquo;s Neck.</p><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">Some books claim that Wyandanch granted the land from Huntington east to Smithtown to Lion Gardiner as a gift for &ldquo;rescuing&rdquo; his kidnapped daughter. For example, in the book, Historic sketches of the Romer, Van Tassel and allied families, and tales of the neutral Ground John Lockwood Romer, 1917, he writes, &ldquo;&hellip;Wyandance died in 1659, leaving a wife, Wuch-i-kit-tau-but and two children, one son named Weon-com-bone and a daughter Catoneras, wife of Jan Cornelius Van Texsel. It was that daughter that Lion Gardiner had ransomed from captivity&hellip;&rdquo;</p><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 24px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">During this era the English were consolidating their seizures of Long Island territories and steering Long Island &ldquo;history&rdquo; as they saw fit. The &ldquo;story&rdquo; of Lion Gardiner obtaining all that land from a &ldquo;grateful&rdquo; Wyandanch are one of those subjects that the Matouwac Research Center will be investigating in depth.</p><p style="background-color: transparent; border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 6px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline">In summary, since some historic records indicate that Wyandanch only had two children, a son and a daughter, what must be determined is was that daughter, Catoneras, who lived on Eaton&rsquo;s neck and was kidnapped and later ransomed, or was she Quashawam who inherited leadership of the Montauks after Wyandanch&rsquo;s death? Is Catoneras and Quashawam the same person? Or, did Wyandanch actually have two daughters, Quashawan AND Catoneras. Obviously, Catoneras and the Van Texel lineage is an interesting and somewhat controversial subject that is worthy of research and debate. This website welcomes some more opinions on this subject.</p></div><div style="border: 0px; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 0px 24px; vertical-align: baseline; font-family: 'helvetica neue', arial, helvetica, 'nimbus sans l', sans-serif; font-size: 12px; color: #333333; line-height: 24px">Reply</div>

 
 
Do you know more about this person's life story? Contact profile creator rodgertr
Errors OccurredX
Errors Loading Page_